Software Bisque

Take a virtual tour of the Software Bisque campus Watch Steve Bisque discuss the Paramount mount with S&T's Dennis Di Cicco Read the Paramount MYT Review Read about the Paramount Software Suite

Taurus mount size questions

rated by 0 users
This post has 3 Replies | 1 Follower

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 513
astrotrf Posted: 12-10-2018 1:16 PM

I am considering a Taurus 400 OAE mount to carry a 16" R-C scope.  I must, however, stay below a 92" height restriction in my rolloff observatory (that could, with some difficulty, be increased to 100").  Thus, I am critically interested in the physical height of the Taurus 400 OAE at the declination pivot point (at 32 degrees north latitude).

I would also need to know the interior spacing between the fork arms and the distance from the declination axis to the base of the fork so I can figure out whether my imaging setup will be able to swing through the bottom of the fork.

At a later date, a drawing of the base of the mount would be useful so I can drill and tap holes in my pier plate to accept the mount.

Is a dimensioned drawing of the Taurus 400 available?

Thanks.

Terry

 

Terry R. Friedrichsen Bunker Ranch Observatory

Top 10 Contributor
Posts 27,522
Software Bisque Employee

astrotrf:

I am considering a Taurus 400 OAE mount to carry a 16" R-C scope.  I must, however, stay below a 92" height restriction in my rolloff observatory (that could, with some difficulty, be increased to 100").  Thus, I am critically interested in the physical height of the Taurus 400 OAE at the declination pivot point (at 32 degrees north latitude).

I would also need to know the interior spacing between the fork arms and the distance from the declination axis to the base of the fork so I can figure out whether my imaging setup will be able to swing through the bottom of the fork.

At a later date, a drawing of the base of the mount would be useful so I can drill and tap holes in my pier plate to accept the mount.

Is a dimensioned drawing of the Taurus 400 available?

Thanks for your interest in the Paramount Taurus 400.  As I understand, we're trying to get the SolidWorks model of the RiFAst OTA from OS so that we can mate it to the Paramount Taurus 400 and provide more accurate measurements for both.  In the meantime, we'll get you just the Taurus dimensions as a PDF.

 

astrotrf:
I would also need to know the interior spacing between the fork arms and the distance from the declination axis to the base of the fork so I can figure out whether my imaging setup will be able to swing through the bottom of the fork.
Note that the Paramount Taurus EQF does not swing the OTA through the fork base.  See Steve's post below for the correct answer...

Daniel R. Bisque

Software Bisque, Inc.

862 Brickyard Circle

Golden, Colorado 80403-8058

Office Hours: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday GMT-7:00

Posting Etiquette

Top 50 Contributor
Posts 513

> Note that the Paramount Taurus EQF does not swing the OTA through the fork base.

Oh.  This would mean that the scope cannot reach the north celestial pole; how much of the area around the pole is lost?

 

Terry R. Friedrichsen Bunker Ranch Observatory

Top 25 Contributor
Posts 1,076
Software Bisque Employee

Actually, the Taurus mounts *do* go through the forks (or beyond the pole) to reach the area below the celestial pole. This is the same thing a German equatorial does when it flips sides of the mount. However, the flip hour angle is +/- 8.5 hours so most of the sky is reachable without having to go through the pole. If the hour angle of the target object exceeds 8.5 hours (or -8.5 hours), the mount will go through the pole to reach it. 

So you can reach all areas of the sky using a Taurus mount. 

 

Stephen M. Bisque

Software Bisque, Inc.

862 Brickyard Circle

Golden, Colorado 80403-8058

Page 1 of 1 (4 items) | RSS

   

© 2019 Software Bisque, Inc. 862 Brickyard Circle, Golden, CO 80403-8058 USA - phone: +1 303 278 4478 fax: +1 303 278 0045
Google+